Webinar-Archive

Webinar Archive

Webinar Archive

Smart Cities | Smart Safety: Intrinsic Safety in the Urban Sewer Environment
September 22, 2022

SPEAKERS: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.

Intrinsic safety is a protection method that allows electrical equipment to operate safely in hazardous areas where explosions may occur. Such areas exist in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and wastewater collection systems and should be a concern for wastewater professionals.

While the probability of explosion in the past has been low, the consequences are high when they do occur – including property damage, injury, and even death. However, as the Internet-of-Things (IoT) fuels the growth of Smart Cities, smart sensors and related electronic equipment are becoming more numerous and more tightly integrated into the urban sewer environment than ever before. As a result, the probability of explosions will increase in Smart Cities without intrinsic safety in mind.

Intrinsic safety is often viewed by wastewater professionals as complex and cost-prohibitive and is often ignored as a result. This webinar is designed to break through these assumptions, providing an overview of intrinsic safety and its application to Smart Cities, including guidelines for risk assessment, best management practices, and regulatory compliance in wastewater collection systems.

Length: 1 hour

Lessons Learned from Three Decades of I/I Work
June 23, 2022

SPEAKERS: Patrick Stevens, P.E.

Patrick has spent more than 50 years in the wastewater and collection system engineering field as a Regulator, an Owner and a Consultant. Thirty of those years have been devoted to Infiltration & Inflow (I/I) and over that time many Rules-of-Thumb and Tricks-of-the-Trade have been formulated and refined by asking Project Managers, “If you could do this project over, what would you do differently?” This webinar will address several of these issues including: (1) a strategy for meter placement to achieve a uniform basin size and get maximum information, (2) a strategy for assuring a successful pre- and post-rehabilitation metering program, and (3) best and worst methods for quantifying and normalizing I/I.

Length: 1 hour
Intersections: Assessing Sewer Performance Based on Sewer Design Guidelines
MAY 26, 2022

SPEAKERS: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.

Sewer flow monitoring provides insight into sewer performance, and that insight is often revealed where it intersects related activities that provide additional perspective and context to flow measurements. Sewer design represents one such point of intersection. Wastewater engineers use various guidelines to design new sewers. These guidelines are well-accepted and well-understood. As such, they can also be applied as Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to evaluate the performance of existing sewers by evaluating flow monitor data with respect to them. This webinar discusses several KPIs adapted from sewer design guidelines, shows how to use them to evaluate the performance of existing sewers, and illustrates actionable insights revealed from them.

Length: 1 hour

Elements to Successful Flow Monitoring: Series
While sewer flow monitoring is performed for a variety of reasons, there are some common elements to successful flow monitoring application. Elements to Successful Flow Monitoring will be presented and discussed in a two-part webinar series. Part 1 will focus on the principle of operation for sewer flow measurement and the pros and cons of different measurement technologies. Part 2 will focus on flow monitor site selection, installation, operation, and maintenance. Whether you work for a municipality, a consulting engineering firm, or a flow service provider, important principles and practical advice will be shared to maximize your monitoring programs.

Once the quantity of flow monitors has been determined and preliminary locations have been proposed to meet the needs of a given project, final locations are selected in the field to provide the best possible flow measurements. Siting guidelines that provide the most accurate results are discussed, as well as competing concerns such as site access, safety, and security.

Once properly sited and installed, flow monitors cannot be forgotten and should be serviced periodically to ensure proper operation. Inadequate or insufficient operation and maintenance (O&M) can adversely affect the accuracy or availability of flow measurements. Common O&M problems associated with flow monitors often originate from environmental factors or equipment problems. Best management practices and practical advice are provided to support successful flow monitoring.

Length: 1 hour

A wide variety of sensors are available today for sewer flow measurement. These sensors are classified according to their principle of operation and the technologies they use. The area-velocity method is the most common approach and relies on flow depth and velocity sensor measurements to calculate flow rate. Flow depth measurement options include ultrasonic and pressure technologies, while flow velocity measurement options include electromagnetic, ultrasonic, radar, and laser technologies. Some of these technologies are applied with submerged sensors, some are applied with non-contact sensors, and some apply a combination of the two. Strengths and weaknesses of each approach and each technology will be discussed, as well flow conditions best suited for them.

Length: 1 hour

Sewer Sociology®: Tracking the Pandemic Through the Eyes of a Sewer
December 02, 2021
SPEAKERS: Patrick Stevens, P.E.; Kevin Enfinger, P.E.

The COVID-19 pandemic has run its course for almost two years now and has upended all of our lives. The normal that we once knew is simply not normal anymore. Instead, our usual routines at home, work, and school have been replaced by new ones involving masks, social distancing, testing, and vaccination – all in a collective effort to beat back the virus.

As sewer sociologists, we have spent much of the past 15 years studying human patterns of normal and departures from normal through the lens of water and sewer use. So as the pandemic began, we knew we were in a unique position to observe the pandemic and its effect on society from a unique perspective. Join us for this webinar as we discuss the impacts of the pandemic through the eyes of a sewer and what they tell us about our hope for a return to normal.

Length: 1 hour

Scattergraph Principles and Practice

How to Use the Scattergraph Poster – A Guided Tour

November 04, 2021
SPEAKERS: Patrick Stevens, P.E.; Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. Last year, ADS hosted a comprehensive webinar series designed to educate wastewater professionals to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions in sewers and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This webinar supplements that series with the release of the latest edition of our popular Scattergraph Principles and Practice Poster. Join Patrick Stevens and Kevin Enfinger as they demonstrate how to use the poster and provide a guided tour. This webinar is both informative and fun and will include tips and tricks, some hidden nuggets of wisdom, and a few behind-the-scenes stories.
Length: 1 hour
The Big Debate: Can Depth-Only Devices Be Used for I/I Work?
September 30, 2021
MODERATOR: Jay Boyd
PANELISTS: Paul Mitchell; Patrick Stevens, P.E.; Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
From the ancient Egyptian Nilometer to Robert Manning’s Manning Equation to Peter Petroff’s Doppler velocity sensor, humans have long sought ways to quantify the flow of water by measuring its depth. New depth-only devices on the market today are being touted as new technologies for chasing I/I. Engineering and operations staff find them attractive because of their lower cost and no confined space entry. However, they rely on the Manning Equation which was virtually abandoned 40 years ago in favor of area-velocity (AV) flow meters in I/I work. These depth-only devices can be very useful, but when used improperly can cause you to look for I/I in all the wrong places. This webinar will provide case studies presented by several different speakers, and a moderated panel discussion will follow.

Length: 1 hour

Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Series

PARTS 1-7

February 25-August, 19 2021
Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.

Length: 46 minutes

Gauge-adjusted radar rainfall (GARR) is a powerful tool that combines rain gauge and radar data to produce high-quality, spatially distributed rainfall data used in I/I studies and hydraulic modeling. This webinar will provide an overview of GARR and discuss how to apply it. Planning considerations will be provided, as well as practical considerations needed for successful implementation and maximum benefit.
Gauge-adjusted radar rainfall (GARR) is a powerful tool that combines rain gauge and radar data to produce high-quality, spatially distributed rainfall data used in I/I studies and hydraulic modeling. This webinar will provide an overview of GARR and discuss how to apply it. Planning considerations will be provided, as well as practical considerations needed for successful implementation and maximum benefit.
The success of a rainfall-dependent inflow and infiltration (RDII) project strongly depends on project planning and execution. This webinar will define the several steps necessary to produce a useful analysis that can determine where RDII is originating and the severity of RDII throughout the study area. Key items to consider include, basin size, determining sewershed boundaries, Gross and Net RDII hydrographs and precompensation of base infiltration. We will discuss the 14 historical methods for quantifying and normalizing RDII values and recommended method(s) for normalizing RDII. Will also discuss the use of Seasons and the number of storms to be included in a study.
To understand the wet weather performance of your sewers, you first have to understand how they perform during dry weather conditions. This webinar will define a “dry day” in the context of I/I studies and show how to extract this information from study data. Key performance indicators (KPIs) include minimum, average, and maximum dry weather flow rates, as well as estimates of wastewater production and groundwater infiltration. Four methods of estimating groundwater infiltration will be discussed, including the % Minimum Method, the Wastewater Production Method, the Stevens-Schutzbach Method, and the Mitchell Method. Once KPIs are obtained, they can be used to benchmark performance against a variety of sewer design guidelines.

Following successful planning, mobilization, and monitoring, I/I can be evaluated to target the most problematic areas of the wastewater collection system for further investigation, inspection, and rehabilitation. The first step is to evaluate rainfall data obtained during the monitoring period. This webinar will discuss the definition of a rainfall event and the characteristics of rainfall events most important to I/I evaluation. Comparing rainfall events to rainfall depth-duration-frequency (DDF) and intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) data will also be discussed, along with spatial distribution methods available to extrapolate point-source rainfall measurements to areal rainfall estimates associated with the study area.

Following the initial planning for an I/I study, it is time to deploy flow monitors and rainfall monitors and gather crucial data needed for successful evaluation.  Part 2 of this webinar series is a panel discussion that provides important insight on what to do and what not to do in this critical phase.  Panelists include ADS project managers and engineers who understand the administration, management, and technical aspects of I/I studies and have a broad range of experience on projects throughout the United States and Canada.

Part 1 provides a framework to help you plan for a successful I/I study.  One of the most important planning objectives is to estimate the scope, schedule, and budget for the monitoring phase, which requires that several questions be asked and answered.  How many flow monitors are needed?  How many rainfall monitors are needed?  When should I start monitoring?  How long should I monitor?  We will discuss the technical implications of these questions and how they influence the success or failure of an I/I study.  Applying the principles here will allow you to position your next I/I study for success.

Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Part 7
PART 7: Gauge-Adjusted Radar Rainfall
August, 19 2021
SPEAKER: Baxter Vieux, PH.D., P.E
Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.
The key objective of an I/I study is establishing the relationship between the rainfall and the I/I that it generates; often called the Q vs i relationship. Each basin has its own relationship that varies with Winter and Summer seasons as well as with Wet Years and Dry Years. This relationship not only is an answer in I/I studies, but it is also a Key Performance Indicator (KPI) of how the work was conducted. We will discuss how the Q vs. i plot can be used to spot storms that were affected by snowmelt, high winds, base infiltration, restricted pipes, and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). Rainfall measurement is mathematically just as important as flow measurement, and rainfall measurement continues to be the greatest source of error/variation of results. We will discuss Control Basins and how they can overcome the vagaries of rainfall in assessing Pre- and Post-rehabilitation success.

Length: 46 minutes

Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Part 6
PART 6: Wet Weather Analysis – Interpreting the Results
July 22, 2021
SPEAKER: Patrick Stevens, P.E.
Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.

Length: 1 hour

The key objective of an I/I study is establishing the relationship between the rainfall and the I/I that it generates; often called the Q vs i relationship. Each basin has its own relationship that varies with Winter and Summer seasons as well as with Wet Years and Dry Years. This relationship not only is an answer in I/I studies, but it is also a Key Performance Indicator (KPI) of how the work was conducted. We will discuss how the Q vs. i plot can be used to spot storms that were affected by snowmelt, high winds, base infiltration, restricted pipes, and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). Rainfall measurement is mathematically just as important as flow measurement, and rainfall measurement continues to be the greatest source of error/variation of results. We will discuss Control Basins and how they can overcome the vagaries of rainfall in assessing Pre- and Post-rehabilitation success.
Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Part 5
PART 5 – Wet Weather Analysis: Setting Up the Work
June, 24 2021
SPEAKER: Patrick Stevens, P.E.
Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.
Length: 1 hour
The success of a rainfall-dependent inflow and infiltration (RDII) project strongly depends on project planning and execution. This webinar will define the several steps necessary to produce a useful analysis that can determine where RDII is originating and the severity of RDII throughout the study area. Key items to consider include, basin size, determining sewershed boundaries, Gross and Net RDII hydrographs and precompensation of base infiltration. We will discuss the 14 historical methods for quantifying and normalizing RDII values and recommended method(s) for normalizing RDII. Will also discuss the use of Seasons and the number of storms to be included in a study.
Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Part 4
PART 4 – Evaluating Dry Weather Conditions
May 27, 2021
SPEAKERS: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.; Paul Mitchell, P.E.
Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.

Length: 1 hour

To understand the wet weather performance of your sewers, you first have to understand how they perform during dry weather conditions. This webinar will define a “dry day” in the context of I/I studies and show how to extract this information from study data. Key performance indicators (KPIs) include minimum, average, and maximum dry weather flow rates, as well as estimates of wastewater production and groundwater infiltration. Four methods of estimating groundwater infiltration will be discussed, including the % Minimum Method, the Wastewater Production Method, the Stevens-Schutzbach Method, and the Mitchell Method. Once KPIs are obtained, they can be used to benchmark performance against a variety of sewer design guidelines.
Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Part 3

PART 3 – Evaluating Rainfall Data

Apr, 22 2021
SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.
Length: 58 minutes

Following successful planning, mobilization, and monitoring, I/I can be evaluated to target the most problematic areas of the wastewater collection system for further investigation, inspection, and rehabilitation. The first step is to evaluate rainfall data obtained during the monitoring period. This webinar will discuss the definition of a rainfall event and the characteristics of rainfall events most important to I/I evaluation. Comparing rainfall events to rainfall depth-duration-frequency (DDF) and intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) data will also be discussed, along with spatial distribution methods available to extrapolate point-source rainfall measurements to areal rainfall estimates associated with the study area.

Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Part 2

PART 2 – Mobilizing and Monitoring with Purpose

Mar, 25 2021
MODERATOR: Kevin Enfinger, P.E. PANELISTS: Michael Armes, PMP; Melissa Surber, P.E.; Paul Mitchell, P.E.
Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.
Length: 57 minutes
Following the initial planning for an I/I study, it is time to deploy flow monitors and rainfall monitors and gather crucial data needed for successful evaluation.  Part 2 of this webinar series is a panel discussion that provides important insight on what to do and what not to do in this critical phase.  Panelists include ADS project managers and engineers who understand the administration, management, and technical aspects of I/I studies and have a broad range of experience on projects throughout the United States and Canada.
Infiltration and Inflow Measurement and Methods Part 1
PART 1 – Planning for Success
Feb, 25 2021

SPEAKERS: Patrick Stevens, P.E. and Kevin Enfinger, P.E.

Have an infiltration and inflow (I/I) problem? You are not alone. Most wastewater collection systems do, and an I/I study is often the first place to start. Join ADS for a six-part webinar series taught by experienced professionals where you will learn how to plan and execute successful I/I studies. The first two webinars will focus on planning, mobilization, and monitoring, while the following four webinars will discuss evaluation methods used to characterize rainfall events and understand dry weather and wet weather sewer performance. I/I studies are fundamental to the success of subsequent condition assessment and rehabilitation programs. Learn how to plan and execute them with confidence to guide and assess the programs that follow.

Length: 57 minutes

Part 1 provides a framework to help you plan for a successful I/I study.  One of the most important planning objectives is to estimate the scope, schedule, and budget for the monitoring phase, which requires that several questions be asked and answered.  How many flow monitors are needed?  How many rainfall monitors are needed?  When should I start monitoring?  How long should I monitor?  We will discuss the technical implications of these questions and how they influence the success or failure of an I/I study.  Applying the principles here will allow you to position your next I/I study for success.

Managing Sewer Blockages & Preventing Overflows: How Utilities Have Adopted Technology to Win Part 2

PART 2 – Technologies and Applications

Sept 29, 2020

SPEAKERS: Jay Boyd and Kevin Enfinger, P.E.

Blockages are a leading cause of sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs), often resulting from grease, roots, and debris build-up. As a key focus of managers and supervisors, collection system O&M maintenance processes are built around their prevention and can consume as much as 60% of the operations budget. Faced with limitations to funding, personnel and time, utilities seeking relief have adopted more sustainable and productive technology-based solutions that alleviate these limitations and improve SSO prevention. This technology-based O&M solution, its supporting technology, and its positive financial impact is presented in a two-part webinar series appropriate for directors, managers and supervisors.

Length: 65 minutes

Part 1 discussed the traditional concept of sewer cleaning using a schedule-based approach, as well as a concept to optimize it using a data-driven approach.  It touched on various enabling technologies, such as remote sensing, the Internet of Things (IoT), and Machine Learning (ML).  A closer look at remote sensing and related IoT technologies was provided, setting the stage for a more detailed discussion of ML.

Part 2 provides a quick overview of Part 1, then dives into a deeper discussion of ML, where we use an ML-based application in sewer blockage prediction as a case study.  While ML is a commonly used phrase today, it is often not completely understood how it works in wastewater applications, and more importantly, the benefits that can be realized.  Examples of this technology in operation are provided, allowing collection system managers and supervisors to see how to use Smart Water technology to make informed decisions.

Case studies are illustrated through several business cases that include quantifiable productivity measures and return on investment.

Managing Sewer Blockages & Preventing Overflows: How Utilities Have Adopted Technology to Win Part 1
PART 1 – Concepts and Technologies
Sept 22, 2020

SPEAKERS: Jay Boyd and Kevin Enfinger, P.E.

Blockages are a leading cause of sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs), often resulting from grease, roots, and debris build-up. As a key focus of managers and supervisors, collection system O&M maintenance processes are built around their prevention and can consume as much as 60% of the operations budget. Faced with limitations to funding, personnel and time, utilities seeking relief have adopted more sustainable and productive technology-based solutions that alleviate these limitations and improve SSO prevention. This technology-based O&M solution, its supporting technology, and its positive financial impact is presented in a two-part webinar series appropriate for directors, managers and supervisors.

Length: 41 minutes

Part 1 examines and evaluates current O&M practices for the prevention of SSOs, specifically cleaning. It looks at long-in-use guidance provided by Capacity, Management, Operation, and Maintenance (CMOM) programs. For more than two decades, these practices have lowered the occurrence of SSOs, yet the decades-old practice of rigorous, unending cleaning has diminishing returns for lowering SSOs. Aging infrastructure and budget constraints are heightening O&M demands without adequate resources to meet them.  Decades-old practices may no longer be sustainable.

The utility response is then discussed showing how their successful adoption of technology gives them collection system visibility by delivering data and information to users. With this visibility, O&M assets are more intelligently deployed. The technology includes advanced, predictive analytics based on machine learning enabling users to see developing blockages, prioritize urgencies, and act in a targeted manner.

The decades-old, schedule-driven process is transformed to a data-driven process with significantly higher efficiency.

Scattergraph Principles and Practice – Part 7
PART 7 – Self-Cleansing in Existing Sewers
June 30, 2020

SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. The Scattergraph Principles and Practice webinar series is designed as an educational resource for wastewater professionals to understand how to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This topic will be covered in a multi-part series.

Length: estimated 1 hour

The purpose of Part 7 is to discuss how to evaluate self-cleansing conditions in sewers. The Tractive Force Method is used to design sewers with self-cleansing conditions based on a critical shear stress, and this approach can also be extended to the evaluation of existing sewers under actual conditions. Self-cleansing conditions are assessed by evaluating flow monitor data on a scattergraph using a critical shear stress curve. Existing sewers with adequate self-cleansing conditions are readily identified, as well as those with a potential for silt, sediment, or debris accumulation. Practical examples from flow monitor locations throughout the United States are provided, demonstrating the application of the Tractive ForceMethod to existing sewers.
Scattergraph Principles and Practice – Part 6
PART 6 – Flow Monitor Performance
June 16, 2020

SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. The Scattergraph Principles and Practice webinar series is designed as an educational resource for wastewater professionals to understand how to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This topic will be covered in a multi-part series.

Length: 54 minutes

The purpose of Part 6 is to discuss how to evaluate the performance of a flow monitor. Previous webinars in this series have discussed characteristic scattergraph patterns that reveal insight into sewer performance and capacity. However, the flow monitor data also leave distinct patterns that allow the performance of the flow monitor itself to be evaluated as well. Practical examples from flow monitor locations are provided, demonstrating the scattergraph signatures of flow monitors that are operating as expected and some that are not. Best management practices to obtain high-quality data will be discussed, as well as what to do when data quality is less than expected.

Scattergraph Principles and Practice – Part 5
PART 5 – Subcritical and Supercritical Flow
June 2, 2020

SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. The Scattergraph Principles and Practice webinar series is designed as an educational resource for wastewater professionals to understand how to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This topic will be covered in a multi-part series.

Length: 54 minutes

The purpose of Part 5 is to discuss the practical application of the Froude Number to flow monitoring. Engineers are aware of the instability associated with critical flow conditions and are generally advised to avoid them during sewer design. However, such conditions are often encountered in existing sewers and can impact the reliability of flow monitor data. The Froude number (Fr) is a dimensionless number used to describe flow conditions within a sewer. These conditions can be illustrated on a scattergraph using iso-Froude lines. Certain flow conditions such as hydraulic jumps, sewer bores, and undular jumps are readily identified by evaluating flow monitor data with respect to iso-Froude lines. Practical examples from flow monitor locations are provided, demonstrating the scattergraph signatures of various transcritical and near-critical phenomena. Flow monitors can operate well in sewers under subcritical and supercritical condition, but accuracy may deteriorate near the transition. Such conditions should be avoided when possible in flow monitoring applications.
Scattergraph Principles and Practice – Part 4
PART 4 – Pump Stations, Siphons, Valves, and Other Structures
May 19, 2020

SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. The Scattergraph Principles and Practice webinar series is designed as an educational resource for wastewater professionals to understand how to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This topic will be covered in a multi-part series.

Length: 48 minutes

The purpose of Part 4 is to discuss how to evaluate the performance of pump stations, siphons, valves, and related structures under certain conditions. A flow monitor located upstream from such structures can provide important information about their operating characteristics. This information is revealed any time a flow monitor operates within backwater conditions influenced by them. The addition of iso-Q™ lines to a scattergraph allows their actual performance to be compared to anticipated performance. Practical examples from flow monitor locations throughout the United States are provided, demonstrating the scattergraph signatures of approach conditions to them.
Scattergraph Principles and Practice – Part 3

PART 3 – SSOs and CSOs

May 5, 2020

SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. The Scattergraph Principles and Practice webinar series is designed as an educational resource for wastewater professionals to understand how to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This topic will be covered in a multi-part series.

Length: 54 minutes

Sewer overflows pose a significant threat to public health and the environment, contributing to beach closures, contamination of drinking water, and other concerns. Knowing when and where they occur – as well as their duration, volume, and frequency – are important pieces of information needed to assess their impact and minimize their future occurrence. The purpose of Part 3 is to discuss sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) and combined sewer overflows (CSOs), including how to recognize them in scattergraphs of flow monitor data. Practical examples from flow monitor locations throughout the United States are provided, demonstrating the scattergraph signatures of SSOs and combined sewer overflows CSOs under various conditions. Techniques are also developed to estimate their duration and volume from flow monitor data.
Scattergraph Principles and Practice – Part 2
PART 2 – Backwater and Surcharge Conditions
April 21, 2020
SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. The Scattergraph Principles and Practice webinar series is designed as an educational resource for wastewater professionals to understand how to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This topic will be covered in a multi-part series. Length: 47 minutes

The purpose of Part 2 is to discuss backwater and surcharge conditions in sewers, including how to recognize them in scattergraphs of flow monitor data. Iso-Quantity or iso-Q™ lines will be introduced and used to demonstrate the effects backwater and surcharge conditions have on sewer capacity and sewer performance.

CSO Smart Data Webinar
IDEX/ADS Environmental Services Innovations in CSO Data Use
April 8, 2020
SPEAKERS: Patrick Stevens, P.E., Mike Armes, Wendy Reust, P.E.
Cities are now using continuous data collection from flow/level metering and rain gauges in collection systems for both control and planning to meet regulatory requirements while optimizing costs. Ft Wayne, IN is operating under a consent decree that anticipates an expenditure of $23 million on new interceptors and storage facilities. They have a network of 100 flow meters, 10 depth monitors and 29 rain gauges that provide real-time feedback in their combined and separated sewer collection system. Data and an innovative understanding of timing of flows in an interceptor has allowed them to reduce the anticipated cost to $5 million.
Length: 54 minutes
Cities are now using continuous data collection from flow/level metering and rain gauges in collection systems for both control and planning to meet regulatory requirements while optimizing costs. Ft Wayne, IN is operating under a consent decree that anticipates an expenditure of $23 million on new interceptors and storage facilities. They have a network of 100 flow meters, 10 depth monitors and 29 rain gauges that provide real-time feedback in their combined and separated sewer collection system. Data and an innovative understanding of timing of flows in an interceptor has allowed them to reduce the anticipated cost to $5 million. A large northeast utility with CSOs needed to better understand the accuracy of their model to predict and estimate CSOs activations and volumes. During an initial study of five sites, it was shown that the model and SCADA varied in accuracy. With the addition of metering, especially at structures impacted by tidal influence, accuracy improved. These sites were equipped with flow meters and inclinometers on the tide gates to indicate gate positioning. Data is collected on an ongoing basis now enabling the utility to assess and report CSO activation accurately. Additionally, the data is used for ongoing calibration of the model. This study’s key features include:
  1. How real-time data is used to control and reduce CSOs.
  2. How continuous data collection and analysis reveals flow-timing to reveal “capacity opportunities” that lower costs and meet regulatory requirements.
SCAttergraph Principles and Practice – Part 1

PART 1: Fundamentals

April 7, 2020

SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
The scattergraph is a powerful tool that displays depth and velocity data from a sewer flow monitor, and the resulting patterns form characteristic signatures that provide insight into conditions within a sewer. The Scattergraph Principles and Practice webinar series is designed as an educational resource for wastewater professionals to understand how to use scattergraphs to recognize various flow conditions and understand how they impact sewer capacity and performance. This topic will be covered in a multi-part series.
Length: 50 minutes

The purpose of Part 1 is to provide a basic understanding of scattergraphs, including the fundamentals on which they are built. An overview of uniform flow conditions is provided, as well as the Manning Equation that represents them. Insights that can be gained by viewing flow monitor data through the lens of the Manning Equation will also be discussed. Important things can be learned by noting when they agree and when they disagree. These fundamentals provide a basic understanding of scattergraphs and serve as building blocks to more advanced principles to follow in this webinar series.

ADS Webinar for Elements to Successful Rainfall Monitoring Part 02
Elements to Successful Rainfall Monitoring – Part 2
Best Management Practices For The Urban Sewer Environment
PART 2: Successful Deployment, Operation, and Maintenance
March 17, 2020
SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
Important engineering decisions are made every day regarding sanitary sewer, combined sewer, and storm sewer systems and often require the use of rainfall data. See how proper installation and maintenance practices will contribute to a successful rainfall monitoring program. Length: 58 minutes
Once a suitable rainfall monitor density has been selected and preliminary locations have been proposed, final locations are selected to provide the best possible rainfall measurements. Siting guidelines that provide the most accurate results are discussed, as well as competing concerns such as site access and security.
Once properly sited and installed, rainfall monitors cannot be forgotten and should be serviced periodically to ensure proper operation. Inadequate or insufficient operation and maintenance (O&M) can adversely affect the accuracy or availability of rainfall measurements. Common O&M problems associated with rainfall monitors often originate from environmental factors or equipment problems. Best management practices and practical advice are provided to support successful rainfall monitoring.
ADS Webinar for Elements to Successful Rainfall Monitoring Part 01
Elements to Successful Rainfall Monitoring – Part 1
Best Management Practices For The Urban Sewer Environment
PART 1: Successful Planning
February 18, 2020
SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.
Important engineering decisions are made every day regarding sanitary sewer, combined sewer, and storm sewer systems and often require the use of rainfall data. See how selecting the right equipment in the right quantities for your local rainfall conditions and your specific applications will lead to a successful rainfall monitoring program.
Length: 46 minutes

Important engineering decisions are made every day regarding sanitary sewer, combined sewer, and storm sewer systems and often require the use of rainfall data. Although these decisions involve significant capital investment and expenditures required to protect public health and the environment, the integrity of rainfall measurements supporting them is often overlooked.

Over the past several years, Kevin Enfinger, P.E. has examined guidance from a variety of professional organizations in engineering, water resources, and meteorological fields and has consolidated his findings into a concise and flexible approach to obtain appropriate rainfall data to support sound engineering evaluations and decisions related to the urban sewer environment. This approach will be presented and discussed in a two-part webinar series:

Selecting rainfall monitor technologies and products suitable to support sewer system design and evaluation requires that two questions be asked and answered. What accuracy is required, and over what rainfall intensity range? Answering these questions provides insight into which technologies are most appropriate and provides a means to evaluate which products can deliver the desired results.

Once suitable equipment has been selected, consideration should then be given to the number of rainfall monitors required. Rainfall monitors measure rainfall at discrete locations. Therefore, multiple rainfall monitors placed in strategic locations will show a clearer picture of the rainfall variations across larger geographic areas. Technical recommendations from several professional organizations are discussed to estimate the number of rainfall monitors required and determine their preliminary locations.

SLiiCER - I/I Analytics for the Next Generation
SLiiCER - I/I Analytics for the Next Generation
November 19, 2019
SPEAKER: Kevin Enfinger, P.E.  
SLiiCER™ makes it easy to evaluate your entire collection system as a single solution, tracking down I/I to guide rehabilitation programs, eliminate overflows, and validate results. Length: 43 minutes
The New SLiiCER™ puts the power and control of your Infiltration and Inflow (I/I) studies back into your hands, providing the most trusted and complete I/I evaluation solution to date. SLiiCER makes it easy to evaluate your entire collection system as a single solution, tracking down I/I to guide rehabilitation programs, eliminate overflows, and validate results. New SLiiCER leverages the power of seamless data integration, trusted analytics, and flexible reporting in a single, unified platform.
See SLiiCER is the best option for:
  • Rainfall Analysis
  • RDII Calculations
  • Rainfall Depth-Duration-Frequency (DDF)
  • Storm-by-Storm RDII
  • System-wide RDII
  • Q vs. i Relationships
  • More Features – Coming 2020
Lower Costs, Lower Risk – New Relief Through Optimized Cleaning
Lower Costs, Lower Risk – New Relief Through Optimized Cleaning
October 22, 2019
SPEAKER: Jay Boyd
Optimize Cleaning – See how new technologies are helping municipalities reduce cleaning by up to 80%, safeguard against SSOs with 24/7 monitoring, and avoid harmful side-effects of overcleaning. Length: 47 minutes
The decade’s old prescription of aggressive cleaning has worked to lower SSOs. Yet, aggressive cleaning means overcleaning and with it, unwanted side-effects. It stresses teams, exhausts municipal resources and prematurely damages pipes just to name a few.

New technologies are making it easier than ever to Optimize Cleaning and avoid the harmful side-effects of overcleaning. See how municipalities are embracing new technology to reduce cleaning while continuing to safeguard their systems from SSOs.
The Allure of Level-Only Monitoring for I/I Webinar
The Allure of Level-Only Monitoring for I/I Webinar
August 27, 2019
SPEAKER: Pat Stevens, P.E.
Is Level Only Monitoring the Right Approach When Conducting Infiltration and Inflow Studies? Length: 48 minutes

From the ancient Egyptian Nilometer to Robert Manning’s Manning Equation to Peter Petroff’s Doppler velocity sensor, humans have been seeking a way to quantify the flow of water by measuring its depth since civilization began.

New depth-only devices on the market today are being touted as new technologies for ‘chasing I/I’. Engineering and operations staff find them attractive because of their lower cost and no confined space entry. However, they rely on the Manning equation which was virtually abandoned 40 years ago in favor of depth-velocity flow meters in I/I work. These devices can be very useful and when used improperly can cause you to look for I/I in all the wrong places.

This webinar will provide case studies including an example of a successful way to implement depth-only metering and a side-by-side comparison of depth-only meters and depth-velocity meters in the same sewershed.